Teton Crest Trail

Who: Me & Jesse
What: Backpacking
When: 8/17/17-8/19/17
Where: Grand Teton National Park
Mileage: 29 miles
Elevation gain/loss: +5,150ft/-8,550ft
More photos: here
CalTopo: here

My sister’s family, my parents, and I headed to the Tetons for the Great American Eclipse of 2017. The whole trip was incredible (my god, being in totality is… it’s just… wow.. maybe more on that in another post) and one of the highlights was hiking a piece of the Teton Crest Trail with my brother in law. The trail follows alongside the Teton crest just to the west, and gives hikers a seldom-seen view of the Tetons, which are much more commonly viewed from the east. We witnessed the most incredible, unbelievable wildflower blooms I’ve ever seen. Two-thousand seventeen was a banner year for wildflowers, with superblooms propagating from desert floors in the spring to mountain meadows in the summer, and I was lucky to find myself thigh deep in fields of flowers on more than one occasion, including this trip.

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Reds Meadow to Duck Pass via Iva Bell Hot Springs and Virginia Lake

Who: Just me!
What: Backpacking
When: 7/21/16-7/24/16
Where: Ansel Adams & John Muir Wilderness
Mileage: 39 miles
Elevation gain/loss: +8,500ft/-6,900ft
More photos: here
CalTopo: here

Driving through the Sierra on my way home after spending a few weeks at the Park City Mathematics Institute, I couldn’t not stop for a short trip. This solo three-nighter was a mix of glorious solitude and frustrating crowds, complete with my back country hot spring and 36 hours without seeing people before picking up the highway that is the JMT/PCT.

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Tamarack Lake, Lonely Lake, and Tablelands in Sequoia National Park

Who: Just me!
What: Backpacking
When: 6/26/18-6/30/18
Where: Sequoia National Park
Mileage: 38 miles
Elevation gain/loss: +10,900ft/-10,900ft
More photos: here

This summer I’m doing quite a few trips with people who haven’t backpacked before in an attempt to do a bit of outdoorsy mentorship and in hopes of propagating an understanding of both Leave No Trace principles and general backpacking etiquette. I had permits for the classic Rae Lakes Loop for this week, but when one person misjudged dates and another wasn’t sure they were in shape enough, I decided to cancel that trip and take a chance to go off on a harder solo trip. I’d been wanting to explore the Tablelands ever since a trip to Moose Lake in 2014, and this seemed like just the time. I planned a relatively easy route with short off-trail days since this would be the first time I was trying to connect ends of a loop off-trail by myself. I got incredibly lucky with perfect weather, an incredible wildflower bloom, and not too many mosquitos yet. Unfortunately, I had Smash Mouth’s All Star in my head the entire time.

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High Uintas // Amethyst Lake and Middle Basin

 

Who: Just me!
What: Backpacking
When: 7/15/16-7/17/16
Where: High Uintas Wilderness
Mileage: 27 miles
Elevation gain/loss: +4,100ft/-4,100ft
More photos: here

I visited Park City Mathematics Institute (Princeton’s temporary IAS outpost in Utah) for three weeks in 2016 and took advantage of the weekends of my visit as an opportunity to explore the local mountains. I took two short trips, a 20 hour overnighter to Silver Glance in the Wasatch and this two nighter to Amethyst Basin and Middle Basin in the High Uintas Wilderness. I thought about doing a section of the Highline Trail, but I couldn’t make the logistics work with my limited days and transportation. Amethyst and Middle Basins provided beautiful alpine lakes and sculpted mountains, but I was a bit disappointed by the beetle-decimated forest, plethora of people, and more ‘skeeters than I’d ever encountered. Still, the beauty of the region was sublime, and it was glorious to see cliffs and ridges carved of rock other than the granite I’m so used to in the Sierra.

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Antelope Valley // Mojave Desert Bloom

Who: J and me
What: Road trip! Almost 1200 miles of driving O_o
When: 3/24/16-3/27/16
Where: Antelope Valley, Mojave NP, and Rainbow Basin
More photos: here

With 2016 shaping up to be a superbloom year but my academic-life time off coming a few weeks off the peak for Death Valley, J and I decided to take a road trip to the Mojave desert. Did you know that Mojave National Preserve has taller sand dunes than Death Valley and more Joshua Trees than Joshua Tree? Yeah well you’re welcome.

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Silver Glance in the Wasatch Range

Who: Just me!
What: Backpacking
When: 7/2/16-7/3/16
Where: Wasatch Range
Mileage: 6.7 miles
Elevation gain/loss: +3,150ft/-3,150ft
More photos: here

I visited Park City Mathematics Institute (Princeton’s temporary IAS outpost in Utah) for three weeks in 2016 and took advantage of the weekends of my visit as an opportunity to explore the local mountains. I took two short trips, this 20 hour overnighter to Silver Glance in the Wasatch and a two nighter in the High Uinta Wilderness. The Wasatch Range lies between Salt Lake City and Park City and it’s home to the famous Sundance Resort (and the film festival of the same name). The proximity of the range to Salt Lake City means many of the trails are teeming with weekend peak-baggers and families on four wheelers. In an effort to avoid the nature’s Disneyland feel, I decided to forego the classic Mount Timpanogos and instead head to little lake without a maintained trail from which I could look at the peak, even if I wouldn’t be summiting it.

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The Circle of Solitude

Who: Jason and me
What: Backpacking
When: 8/4/16-8/11/16
Where: Kings Canyon National Park
Mileage: 66 miles
Elevation gain/loss: +17,600ft/-17,600ft
More photos: here (see Jason’s here)

A big ol’ loop from the depths of the Kings River up to the Sierra crest and back round again. Jason and I completed a modified version of the classic hike dubbed the “Circle of Solitude” by Mike White in his book Kings Canyon National Park, cutting south to Lake Reflection and heading off-trail over the awful death trap that is Harrison Pass instead of taking the longer route over Forester Pass. I’d been eyeing this loop since reading CaliTrails report of it in 2013. Coming from LA, an east side entrance over Kearsarge Pass made sense for him, but the one of the things that made this loop appeal to me is the combination of a west side entrance with all the glory of lots of time spent in the high country. The trip was as gorgeous as I’d imagined and Harrison Pass pushed both Jason and me to (past?) our limits of comfort.

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